5 simple questions every social enterprise marketer should ask oneself

By Kirti Punia|15th Nov 2013
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It is easier than ever to broadcast your message to billions today. But with an inestimable number of marketing messages floating on the internet it is tougher than ever for businesses to get the attention of consumers. People come across a plethora of such messages every day, open a few, remember fewer and connect with one out of a million. Online marketing is the easiest one a social enterprise can adopt for reaching out to the set of their customers with access to internet.

Social enterprises must be very mindful while bundling the components of a marketing message. Not just in the marketing campaigns but in every communication, there are some key aspects which should be paid attention to. These three small questions, if answered right in your communication, can build you a wide network of contributors, supporters and customers. 


marketing social enterprise marketing

Is your message conveying the right balance of your offering and its impact?

Social enterprises need a perfect balance between the business and its impact. The results of losing this balance can be catastrophic. The same applies to all the marketing messages too. The product or service that you offer and the impact it creates is the full package you ultimately sell to a customer. If your message does not communicate what all a customer gets (the product/service and its impact), he/she might be less interested in the value proposition offered.

Is your message making people feel a part of the problem or the solution?

You might be angry, disappointed or disgusted at the irresponsible behavior of your neighbors which has lead to a heap of garbage in your lane. You have decided to clean it up and need help for it. But do you think telling them that a part of this waste has come from their homes and they should now help in cleaning it up, going to help you in any way? No, it will not. You have to make them a part of the cleaning up process. Accusing people of being responsible for the bad creates a community of troublemakers, involving them in creating the good will lead to sustainable solutions.

Is your message creating sympathy or empathy?

Sympathy makes people feel bad for others whereas empathy goes beyond just feelings and words. It leads to action because it creates a sense of responsibility. It leads to a deeper connection to the people facing the problem and an urge to be a part of the solution. Be careful while choosing your words, small changes in the message can change the whole game for you. Sympathetic messaging may melt hearts but empathetic messaging will get people to lend a hand and that’s what you need.

Is your message tone positive or negative?

You might be coming across hundreds of negative aspects of the problem at hand. Dire situations, mindsets, some government policies, non cooperative people and the list can go on and on, but you are working on changing all this. You are working on making all this the past and creating the bright future. Your message should also reflect the same positivity. Saying ‘it’s not impossible’ and ‘it’s easily possible if…’ has a subtle difference that creates a superior psychological difference. This softer aspect of communication can help you build a very strong connection with your audience.

Is your message involving the people who benefit from your work or not?

The end customers whose problems are being solved by your organization are the best testimonial to your work. Do not forget to mention their stories, be it in words, pictures or videos. It also helps in developing trust toward your work. Proven end results are always convince more than elaborate plans.