EDITIONS
Think Change India

Bengaluru startup develops tech to ensure proper care of expectant mothers

Think Change India
2nd Aug 2017
Add to
Shares
655
Comments
Share This
Add to
Shares
655
Comments
Share

One of the biggest problems faced by hospitals in India is that they are understaffed, as a result of which most doctors and nurses are overworked. In such a scenario, a reduction in their workload will be a boon to all. In developing a technology to ensure proper assessment of expectant mothers, Janitri, a startup from Bengaluru, has done just that.

Image Source: Linkedin

The technology developed by this startup continuously monitors the vital parameters of the expectant mother in the hours leading up to the delivery. Formerly known as Laborconnect, this software has now been renamed 'Daksh'. It comes installed in a tablet which is attached to a stand. The parameters monitored include mother and child’s heart rate, contractions, labour duration, blood pressure, and so on.

The information is presented in such a way that it is easy to understand. Once the device has been fully charged, it can last up to three days. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends the monitoring of progress in labour, in the form of a graphical record known as a partogram.

Daksh aims to comply with WHO's guidelines, ensuring that the women receive the necessary care before delivery. Dr Kumar Yadappanavar, one of the doctors from a primary health centre (PHC) where the tablet was distributed, told FactorDaily,

Daksh helps us keep a check on all the patients simultaneously. In case of an emergency, it tells us what treatment we should administer, and helps us take quick decisions. While recording the parameters manually in the partograph, errors occur sometimes, but this software has zero errors.

Twenty-seven-year-old Arun Agarwal, who is the man behind this startup, has done his master's in biomedical engineering. While talking about this idea, he told FactorDaily,

There is no awareness about the WHO protocol and neither are nurses taught how to interpret it. I have noticed there is also a lack of interest or lack of time to follow the protocol. This leads to wrong decision making, often resulting in maternity deaths.

Janitri distributed nine tablets to PHCs in February. Of the nine, two were distributed in Bengaluru and the remaining seven in northern Karnataka. They were also distributed and tested in Rajasthan earlier. As per Janitri, they have successfully monitored 250 expectant women till now.

Do you have an interesting story to share? Please write to us at tci@yourstory.com. To stay updated with more positive news, please connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Report an issue
Add to
Shares
655
Comments
Share This
Add to
Shares
655
Comments
Share
Authors

Related Tags