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Choosing the right partner for outsourcing animation projects 

Animation has established itself as an important part of the video experience for businesses looking to present an interesting and engaging forward face to consumers. Stepping into animation projects can be a big challenge if you lack the expertise in-house to handle it, though.

Many businesses and entrepreneurs tackle the problem of creating animation projects by using outsource animation partners to provide them with the animation they need for videos and ad campaigns. And even organizations that have in-house video animation teams may find that a big project or looming deadline may require enlisting some outside aid. Finding a solid and reliable partner for outsource animation is important when you’re counting on timely and professional results. Here are some tips to help you work through the process of finding the right partner.

Define your goals

You’ll not only want to define the task that you’re outsourcing, but also the reasons for why you’re doing it. Do you need some temporary outsource animation help to handle an increase in work load? Or are you looking to tap into expertise and experience you may not have in-house with your outsource animation partner? It’s important to determine not only the what, but the why before you start shopping around for an outsource animation partner.

Check your potential partner’s track record

You’ll want to examine how well your potential outsource animation vendor has handled jobs that are similar to the ones that you want to outsource. Dig and ask for details about how many jobs like yours they’ve handled, and find out the experience and qualifications of the project managers and animators they might assign to your jobs.

Ask for references

Insist on getting a list of client references and sample works that your potential partner has handled. Follow up and contact the clients they’ve worked with and see how well they’ve met deadlines, answered communications, and what their level of satisfaction with the work they presented them was.

Avoid communications breakdown

Even if your potential partner has the technical skills to do the job, poor communications can have a big impact on how smoothly your outsource animation project works. Consider some important details, such as the time zone your partner works in, avenues of contact (email, Skype, etc.), and common language. Find out if they’ll assign a single point person you can communicate with about the project, and ensure that they’ll be available at times that are convenient for your business.

Check on their financial stability

If you’re going to assign a large and important project to an outsourcer, it’s important to consider how stable the company is. An in-depth look at the company’s track record and financial background in not out of the question as something that’s worth investigating.

See if their IT infrastructure and security is up to the task

In a video outsourcing relationship, you’ll need to transfer large amounts of data back and forth. The IT infrastructure of your potential partners needs to be able to handle this load with ease. It’s also important that any vendors you work with have the latest in security procedures in place so that you don’t run the risk of importing infected files from them.

Start small and grow your relationship

If you’re considering a long-term relationship with an outsource animation vendor, it’s a smart strategy to start small and see how your working relationship with them evolves. As a number of projects are completed, you’ll be able to fully evaluate whether or not it makes sense to continue the relationship and scale up the amount of work you rely upon them to produce. 

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Stories by Helen Clark