English
  • English
  • हिन्दी
  • বাংলা
  • తెలుగు
  • தமிழ்
  • ಕನ್ನಡ
  • मराठी
  • മലയാളം
  • ଓଡିଆ
  • ગુજરાતી
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • অসমীয়া
  • اردو

Five Organic Ways to Celebrate Holi 

Holi is the most vibrant festival of colors, which is celebrated in India with utmost excitement in several ways. It signifies the commencement of spring, and glorifies the victory of good over bad with Holika Dahan. Water and colors are two common elements, which most people use to celebrate Holi with their loved ones. Due to lack of consideration of the importance of eco-friendly Holi, many people do not realize the impacts of our harmful ways of celebrating Holi on our environment are toxic.

Water is wasted in huge amounts on Holi, and colors with chemicals lead to serious skin problems. As responsible citizens, people need to keep a balance between their craving for traditional celebrations and their responsibility towards Mother Nature. There are plenty of pleasurable eco-friendly Holi celebrations, which undoubtedly, intensify the fun of playing Holi. Here are five organic ways to celebrate Holi:

1. Use home-made colors to play Holi

Celebrating Holi with natural colors is a really thoughtful way. You must be wondering how to make natural colors. Don’t worry! It is not rocket science. All you have to do is use chandan, henna, and turmeric. Use these common eco-friendly colors sources to form distinctive amalgamations, and in turn, form different colors. They are gentle and smoothly washable.

2. Opt for dry Holi

If you understand the significance of our environment, and if you wish to to celebrate the Holi festival in an eco-friendly way, then you should opt for dry Holi. Avoid water balloons, pichkaris, paints, and bags, since these lead to water waste, serious injuries, and skin issues. Also, colors with chemicals and paints are not easily washable.

3. Play tilak Holi

Avoid hurling water balloons, and using colors with chemicals on your loved ones. There is a better way to keep the Holi celebration quite subtle and eco-friendly. You can choose to play Tilak Holi, where you just draw a Tilak on the forehead of your loved one. So, this is the cleanest eco-friendly way of playing Holi with your loved ones.

4. Play Holi with flowers, aka ‘Phoolon ki Holi’

There are many cities in India, where people play Holi with flower petals, such as Pushkar and Lucknow. They joyfully groove to their favorite Holi songs, for example Rang Barse from Silsila. So, if you realize the importance of eco-friendly Holi, opt for Phoolon ki Holi and make sure you and everyone around you dump flowers in dustbins. One of the most commonly used flowers in Holi is Tesu. Interestingly, there are numerous health benefits of Tesu flowers, for example these stop nasal bleeding, and cure eye disorders. These flowers not only enhance your Holi celebration, but also take care of your skin as well as environment. One more effective use of Tesu flowers in Holi is that you can use these to form harmless water colors.

5. Burn eco-friendly waste for Holika Dahan

Avoid wooden objects to avoid deforestation. Instead, use waste boxes, coconut waste, and cow dung for Holika Dahan, so that you commence your Holi celebration in an eco-friendly way.

Holi is definitely one of such festivals, which is celebrated with massive excitement and enthusiasm. However, there are so many people whose ways of celebrating Holi are hazardous for the environment, which in turn, lead to serious environmental issues. These harmful ways also lead to severe skin issues, and injuries. Therefore, realize the importance of eco-friendly Holi, and relish your love for Mother Nature by celebrating the Holi festival in an eco-friendly way. 

This is a YourStory community post, written by one of our readers.The images and content in this post belong to their respective owners. If you feel that any content posted here is a violation of your copyright, please write to us at mystory@yourstory.com and we will take it down. There has been no commercial exchange by YourStory for the publication of this article.

Stories by Neha Singh