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4 super funny books to make mommies laugh on Mother’s Day!

Sharika Nair
9th May 2016
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As the saying goes, “The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world,” or, in other words, mothers are awesome! But there are days when children are overly difficult, there is too much pending work and things keep going wrong – days when even the most patient mothers could do with a pick-me-up! Anyone – be you an expecting mom, the mother of a toddler, or the mother of grown children who have fled the nest – would love reading up on the funny side of the parent-child equation. So without much ado, here is a list of four fun-filled books that are an easy read for those moments when your precious, adorable monster has finally taken a nap.

Confessions of a Scary Mommy: An Honest and Irreverent Look at Motherhood – The Good, the Bad, and the Scary – by Jill Smokler

Jill Smokler’s book had its conception (pun intended) as a blog, where she wrote about her experiences of motherhood, mainly to keep her friends and family up to date. But to her surprise, she struck a chord in the hearts of mothers everywhere. As the title suggests, the book is a funny and irreverent look at motherhood. She recommends that mothers pledge to the following tenets:

  • I shall remember that no mother is perfect and my children will thrive because, and sometimes even in spite, of me.
  • I shall not preach to a fellow mother who has not asked my opinion. It’s none of my damn business.
  • I shall maintain a sense of humour about all things motherhood.

Quotes:

  • I end up doing my son’s homework. It’s wrong, but so much easier.
  • Sometimes I wish my son was still little—then I hear kids screaming at the store.
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Motherhood: The Second Oldest Profession – by Erma Bombeck

American humourist, Erma Bombeck, had a newspaper column that was extremely popular during the 1960s and 70s. While her references to girdles and transistor radios might be outdated, the jokes are still funny and her experience of raising children is still relevant. Her other books – The Grass is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank and, also, Just Wait Till You Have Children of Your Own! – were bestsellers too.

Quotes:

  • When your mother asks, “Do you want a piece of advice?” it is a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.
  • I take a very practical view of raising children. I put a sign in each of their rooms: “Checkout Time is 18 years.”
  • This book would not be complete without a chapter on my mother, who at this moment is leafing through it to see if she is mentioned.

The Kid Dictionary: Hilarious Words to Describe the Indescribable Things Kids Do – by Eric Ruhalter

This super funny book asks these questions, “Been a kid? Have a kid? Know a kid? Been left utterly speechless by the wit, wisdom, grossness, and hilarity that accompanies children wherever they go?”

The Kid Dictionary has ingenious and hilarious words to describe the indescribable life with kids. The book is perfect for anyone with kids in their life, even remotely — from expectant parents to grandparents to aunts and uncles.

Quotes:

  • Wishjack: (WISH—jak) v: to blow out the candles on another child’s birthday cake.
  • Harrask (huh-RASK) v: when a child persists in asking again and again for permission to do something in the fervent hope that your answer will change from no to yes
  • Brofitti: (broh-FEE-tee) v: the act of scribbling with a permanent marker on the face of a younger sibling.
  • Clandesdine: (klan-DES-dyne) v: to hide from one’s child while eating a cookie so he doesn’t ask for one too.
  • Poppalarity (PAH-puh-lahr-i- tee) n: the high approval rating that pushover dads receive from their kids for letting them watch more TV, eat more junk, and stay up much later than they should.
  • Lullacry (LULL-uh-cry) n: the dramatic, seemingly interminable pause between a child sustaining an injury and beginning to wail.

Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Year ― by Anne Lamott 

Anne Lamott’s account of her son’s first year is an honest portrayal of motherhood. A teacher, single mother and ex-alcoholic, Anne writes about her personal journey. With affection and humour, she narrates the changes, exhaustion, and love that her son, Sam, brought to her life. The book moves from hilarious to poignant when Sam’s flourishing life is contrasted with a very close friend’s illness. Instead of being a sugary glorification of parenthood, the book speaks to the very realistic highs and lows of being a mother.

Quote: “I don’t remember who said this, but there really are places in the heart you don’t even know exist until you love a child.”

Happy Mother’s Day!

 

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