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5 elements of a great logo

Sromona Bhattacharyya
1st Feb 2017
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Think of any company. The first thing to strike your mind would most probably be the brand’s logo. For example, when someone says ‘Apple’, the first thing that would come to your mind is the simple, sleek, yet creative apple with a missing bite. That is probably why ace graphic designer Paul Rand was rightly justified to say, “If, in the business of communications, ‘image is king,’ the essence of this image, the logo, is the jewel in its crown.”

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Image : shutterstock

That tiny little piece of art has a whole lot of responsibility since the logo at a glance provides as much information at it can about the company, creatively and cleverly. It captures the companies brand and becomes a single visible manifestation of the brand that will make its rounds in the targeted market. While a great logo can do wonders for your business, a cheaply or a not well-thought of logo can and will drag the company’s image down. Every businessperson should take care when it comes to investing and putting thought while creating their logo.

Here are the elements that usually go into a great logo:

Keeping it simple          

While creating a logo, simplicity is the best policy. A clean and uncluttered logo which showcases all the information about the company without losing any details has the capability to become very impactful. Swear by the ‘less is more’ formula while creating a logo because they are used in a variety of ways, and often on multiple platforms. An overly complex one might just lose details and make it unintelligible.

The integrated V and W of Volkswagen and stylized ‘S’ of Suzuki reeks simplicity but has been able to capture our hearts through decades.

Aesthetically appealing

Visual appeal is very powerful, and that is why logos are given priority. A good logo has to be appealing – this invokes a heightened sense positivity in whosoever sees it. Of course it is business, but logos should be fun and innovative so as to excite people about the business in question.

A classic example that comes to my mind is the 2012 London Olympics jagged ‘Z’ logo which received some major backlash back in the day. The bright neon pink with all the zigzags wasn’t all that appealing to many.

Memorability

When a logo has too many parts, it becomes very troublesome for anyone to remember it after a quick glance, and a glance is all that your logo will get from most of the people. People should be able to equate the logo with a symbol, conveying a singular idea that is of your brand. A complex and overly stylised logo can easily get dismissed. Think along the lines of the Olympic symbol, or the WWF logo, or even the ‘I (Heart) NY’ logo. They all are easy to memorize and recollect.

Be unique

It’s very easy for a first timer who is trying their hand at logo making to get inspired by some other logo and go, ‘I want that too!’ This fallacy should be avoided at all cost, because when you go about mimicking someone else’s work, not only will you receive the hate, you will get lost in a split second. For example, the telecom industry is filled with logos involving globes and the education industry with books and pencils. Try avoiding the commonality or the trend in the industry that you are working in.

Timelessness

Look at a company’s logo now and look at it from 20 years ago. Yes, they may have made a few changes to keep it contemporary and in vogue, but for the most part you can easily spot the similarities. A logo should always be made while keeping in mind one pertinent question, “will be relevant in the next five years or not?”

Coco-Cola’s logo evolution over the decades is a classic example of the timelessness of the fizzy drink.

Companies often play fast and loose when it comes to creating a brand logo. One should never forget that the logo you choose will be the face of your company, and it’s going to say a lot about the kind of business. As much as we hate to admit it, we do judge a book by its cover, and the aesthetics, proportions, style, and font of your logo will determine the kind of crowd it draws.

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