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Inimitable Approach can be your Key to Enigmatic PR Campaign Development Process 

I have read innumerable articles on branding and effective PR campaigns development which usually include focus, research, smart strategy formation, target audience, etc.

Why would anyone go for a particular brand ditching its adversaries? Do the other brands not have that product? Of course, they do! But one chooses a specific brand because that brand was successful in conveying its expedience to the public. That’s what public relations and marketing do to the products and their brands.

I have read innumerable articles on branding and effective PR campaigns development which usually include focus, research, smart strategy formation, target audience, etc.

I agree with all of it, but I find these things useless without one thing, and that is- innovation. My business philosophy is that nothing works better than creativity in any field, including public relations. If your PR campaign has a queer angle to reach the public which has never been used before, it is bound to work when executed as planned. Inimitable approach definitely has the dominance over other factors in developing the enigmatic PR campaigns.

The best illustration to justify my belief is Amul, India. It is incredibly fun to decipher different factors that made Amul, the most loved brand not only for its dairy products, but also for its PR campaigns. Yes, you read that right! People in India, including me, wait for Amul’s hoardings to get changed. Yes, in this digital era!

Amul’s best creation- The blue headed girl

When every brand was spending lakhs on signing big celebrities to represent their products, Amul’s first billboard created by daCunha and art director Eustace Fernandes featured a cartoon character developed by them. They went against the belief of must-have a famous face to represent your brand in public, and since 1966, they have been flashing this blue haired girl in their billboards, print ads, and now in social media.

Amul’s simple and consistent, yet individualistic approach of representation!

The tagline of Amul, “Utterly, butterly delicious!” is in practice since it was created. It has been more than 40 years and they have not felt the need of changing it and neither have we. Their ads are always simple and you will never sense an overload of information in their ads. The fact is they don’t target featuring their pluses, they just weave the properties with a pun related to current events. Their witty puns are concomitant to butter, bread, or milk in some way, yet they have never failed to express their views on the ongoing events in that punch lines. Amul covers politics, sports, movies, any current event without fearing the outcome and have gotten away with their creativity every single time.

It is unbelievable though, the way their adboards create sensation is phenomenal. Everything about this brand is unique. This creative approach of showing wit and cheeky commentary by the Amul girl has saved them a huge amount of money that is usually gushed in celebrities’ accounts.

Other effective PR campaigns with unique approach as its forte

To launch their smaller-sized range, drink brand Tropicana chose to prove the fact that 150ml glass of orange juice is 60% of the required daily amount of vitamin C through a 5.2m high interactive juice dispensing billboard in London. Giving away a 150ml glass of free orange juice to ultimately convey that their new size range will be the perfect way to consume 60% of the required vitamin C in a day is tremendously smart on their part.

I bet no other brand must have used the fact of Vitamin C consumption to promote their brand in such a subtle way.

After the prodigious success of Nike’s PR campaign with Indian women’s success in sports as their theme complemented by zealous and bouncing Da Da Ding song which was highly appreciated by the public, Puma launched a similar PR campaign. In spite of their centre theme being analogous, that of women empowerment, Puma’s “Do you?” campaign did not fail.

“Do you” know why?

Because, while Nike’s music and Deepika Padukone along with other sports women took the entire weight of their campaign, Puma chose to reflect women’s success in completely a different way.

Puma chose to create a world record for “the most people to hold the plank position together”. This movement was led by International model-actress Cara Delevingne, the face of Puma and was supported by Sakshi Malik, Indian wrestler, Jacqueline Fernandez and Kalki Koechlin, Bollywood actresses, and Ujjwala Raut, Indian model. 1623 women hold abdominal plank for 60 seconds to create this world record.

Putting your own thought that may provoke your audience can lend an unimaginable success to your PR campaign. Along with the usual strategizing factors, make creativity your partner if your really want to develop a lasting connection with the public. 

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Founder of 'Write Right'- A Content Marketing Firm. Author of The Weak Point Dealer, and 'Will You Walk A Mile?' Contributing Author to HuffingtonPost, Entrepreneur, YourStory, LifeHack, TNW and Inc42. Bohemian by nature, Rapper by Passion, Story-Teller by Soul, and a Wanderlust, he wants to explore the intersection of philosophy and psychology. He is smartly dumb, genius moron, dynamically stubborn and occasionally an engineer. Die hard fan of fictional characters- Sheldon Cooper, Chandler Bing, Charlie Harper, Daenerys Targaryen, Barney Stinson, Joey Tribianni and Tyrion Lannister. LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/bhaviksarkhedi Website- http://www.bhaviksarkhedi.com

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