This 13-year-old has developed guiding spectacles that can help visually and hearing-impaired people

Priyabrata Sahoo’s innovation comes in two models, one with an ultrasonic sensor and a buzzer for visually impaired people, and an ultrasonic sensor, buzzer, and vibrator motor for visually impaired and hearing-impaired people.

1st Jan 2020
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Over the years, the disabled community too has reaped the benefits of the vast technological advancements that have been noted in almost every field. The simple support stick or the humble hearing aid have seen so many iterations and have enabled visually and hearing-impaired persons live more independent lives.


Taking a crack at devices that make disabled persons’ lives simpler is Class 8 student Priyabrata Sahoo. Hailing from Odisha, the youngster has developed a kind of glasses that would give out a signal and alert the user about an obstacle in their way.


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Priyabrata Sahoo, with the eye gear for the visually and hearing impaired people (Image: Hindustan Times)




Speaking to Hindustan Times about his innovation, the student said,


“I got the idea when I saw a visually impaired elderly person of my village facing difficulty in moving around without support. So, I decided to do something and discussed the same with my science teacher, Tusharkanti Mishra.”


Studying at Prahallad Chandra Brahmachari High School at Adanga in Purushottampur in Jajpur district, Priyabrata made the glasses at Atal Tinkering Laboratory in his school. His latest innovation comes in two models: one with an ultrasonic sensor and a buzzer for visually impaired people, and another with an ultrasonic sensor, buzzer, and vibrator motor for visually impaired and hearing-impaired people.


Priyabrata told Odishabytes,


“I want to upgrade the glasses by adding GPS motor and speaker to them. The glasses will then relate to Google Maps and will be voice-controlled. Once a person enters an address, they will be guided to it automatically.”


Priyabrata’s teacher explained that the student had walked to him and asked about the possibilities of developing something for the visually impaired people in the school laboratory. His interest in providing solutions for visually and hearing-impaired people is such that he stays back in school and comes even on Sundays to work on his project.


To understand and enhance the glasses, Priyabrata went on to learn about sensor-driven motors through books and with some help from teachers. Next steps for the teenager include applying for a patent for the glasses.



(Edited by Evelyn Ratnakumar)



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