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‘There are no boundaries between maths, science and art’ – Kalyan Rathore, industrial designer and artist

Madanmohan Rao
2nd Sep 2018
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This photo essay on the Gallery Manora exhibition explores the geometric patterns of connections between nature and art.


PhotoSparks is a weekly feature from YourStory, with photographs that celebrate the spirit of creativity and innovation. In the earlier 235 posts, we featured an art festival, cartoon gallery. world music festivaltelecom expomillets fair, climate change expo, wildlife conference, startup festival, Diwali rangoli, and jazz festival.

Mathematical patterns are at the heart of science and nature – and even art and design, as shown in the exhibition ‘Bend: The Nature of Change and the Order of Repetition.’ Curated by art consultant Nalini Malaviya, it features the works of Bengaluru designer-artist Kalyan Rathore, at Gallery Manora in Indiranagar.

Industrial designer Kalyan has now ventured full-time into art, and creatively explores how repetitive patterns play themselves out in sculpture. Repetition along with an element of randomness can create a number of related objects, as Kalyan explores using stainless steel and mild steel.

Mathematical sequences such as the Fibonacci series have been found in patterns of sunflower florets, and other patterns can explain the shapes of snowflakes and even algae (see my earlier photo essay on the Math Museum in New York city). “‘Bend’ is my ode to the world of distortion – distortion by design and design by repetition,” said Kalyan in a chat with YourStory.

These principles inspired by geometry and biology play out in the works showcased in this photo essay (along with some of Kalyan’s earlier pieces), titled Serendipity, Plural, Efflorescence, Curiosity, Equilibrium, and Bloom. Some of his works have also been showcased in other exhibitions in Singapore.

The art works are priced from Rs 25,000 up to Rs. 4.5 lakhs. Kalyan’s continuing search for the “geometric predisposition in objects” will hopefully take his next exhibition, titled ‘Balance and Nature,’ to Tokyo.

His exhibition at Gallery Manora can help audiences explore the role of patterns and templates in life, Kalyan explains; it can show the connections between thought, emotion, society and the broader world. “There are no boundaries between maths, science and art,” he says.

“Go beyond the traditional concepts of art and go to the core of form and design. Explore your own personality in a contemporary context,” Kalyan advises aspiring artists.

The ecosystem of art venues, festivals, curators and corporate sponsors is evolving in India, explains art consultant and blogger Nalini Malaviya. “It is one thing to look at images and photos of art, but to really experience art you have to come to a gallery,” she urges audiences. Immersing oneself in the artistic experience opens up new ways of looking at and appreciating the world.

Now what you have done today to get insights from outside your field, and see the connections that leap across different worlds?

Kalyan Rathore

Got a creative photograph to share? Email us at PhotoSparks@YourStory.com!

See also the YourStory pocketbook ‘Proverbs and Quotes for Entrepreneurs: A World of Inspiration for Startups,’ accessible as apps for Apple and Android devices.

 

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