From expression to exposure: how creativity is about understanding audiences and overcoming disappointment

Showcasing your work to customers is a key part of the creative journey – but this can also lead to disappointment or discouragement if there is no audience connect. Overcoming defeat is a key part of the creative process, as these artists at Karnataka Chitrakala Parishat explain.

10th May 2019
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PhotoSparks is a weekly feature from YourStory, with photographs that celebrate the spirit of creativity and innovation. In the earlier 335 posts, we featured an art festival, cartoon gallery. world music festivaltelecom expomillets fair, climate change expo, wildlife conference, startup festival, Diwali rangoli, and jazz festival.


In Part II of our coverage on artistic exhibitions at Karnataka Chitrakala Parishat in Bengaluru, we feature more insights on art, meaning, and purpose (see Part I here). Priced from Rs 5,000 to Rs 65,000, the artworks cover a wide range of formats, materials, themes and messages. The artist lineup includes Shana Gokul, Sikha Jayanth, CP Lenin, Rahul Janrao Kirdak, Lakshman Kabadi, Keya Mahata, Antony Raju, and Kushboo Rathod.


“Art gives you freedom of expression. It allows you to convey your deepest thoughts and feelings without being judged or labelled,” explains Pallavi Wadappi, in a chat with YourStory. Her works feature interplays of colour in an abstract manger, without specific forms or definite boundaries.


She advises aspiring artists to keep practicing, never lose hope, and paint or draw things that are inspiring. “Success will eventually come, your passion should drive you,” she explains.


“Art allows you to express not just your inner journeys but also your connection to nature, the world, society and people,” adds Sampa Das. “When my creations touch the audience’s heart in a way that can brings about a change in them or in society, only then will I feel successful as an artist,” she explains.


Her works span the connections between mind and machine. For example, the brain on soothing grass represents peace in busy urban life, and butterflies on the brain depict the touch of love.


“I tell my viewers that when nature touches us, we enter the world of peace even though we found ourselves surrounded by challenges and worries,” Sampa explains. “Create your own feelings through colours,” she advises aspiring artists.


Art is a way of communication between artists and audiences who may not speak the same language, says Thane-based painter Rahul Kirdak. It allows audiences to understand what the artist is exploring; it also fulfills a need in life to go beyond difficulties and find happiness.


Most artists will tell you that art brings you happiness and success beyond money, he explains. “Art is a beautiful gift from God. Getting audiences to view and understand my work, and become happy as a result of it, is great success for me as an artist,” Rahul adds. For aspiring artists, he recommends regular practice, reading, observation, and honesty.


For bamboo artist Lenin CP, art is an inner exploration and way to recreate memories that I have long lost. “I tried to hold back those childhood memories and scenic experiences through my artworks,” he explains. The very completion of a work of art is a source of satisfaction and relief.


“That sublimity is what I call happiness and success,” he adds. Water is a form meditation for him. “I spend hours with water, simply gazing at it how it creates forms and listening to how it whispers. That bond with water enables my communication through art also,” Lenin explains.


“Art is universal. Every being is a part of art, and everyone can find shades of their being in art. Try to evolve in art,” he advises audiences. “Communicate constantly through art, that can bring life to a material and bring out novelty and differences. Full involvement and dedication is needed for a life in art,” he advises aspiring artists.


Divya TR uses scribble art to express her creative energy even for durations of 15 minutes. “When something is bothering you, just take a pen and paper and scribble it. It will give a lot of relief, you will feel better,” she explains. She says scribble art helped overcome some of her stress during pregnancy.


Art helps express feelings that can’t be conveyed easily through words, Divya says. She defines success through art as being able to bring a spark to the eyes of audiences, or even making them pause and reflect for a moment.


“Understanding the audience is very important if you want to sell your artwork,” Divya advises aspiring artists. Analyse not just the size and medium of your intended artworks, but also audience likes and dislikes that helps overcome disappointment if the pieces of art are not sold, she says. Such disappointment is also a part of the artist experience, and overcoming it will lead to eventual recognition by audiences and other artists.


She also advises creative communities to keep an eye on shows of emerging and established artists. “One should also keep trying to exhibit the artwork frequently, at least two shows in a year, to get popularity,” Divya signs off.


Now, what have you done today to pause in your busy life, and share some of your inner creative thoughts and expressions with the wider community?


Got a creative photograph to share? Email us at PhotoSparks@YourStory.com!


See also the YourStory pocketbook ‘Proverbs and Quotes for Entrepreneurs: A World of Inspiration for Startups,’ accessible as apps for Apple and Android devices.


Also read: The six components of creativity – and how to make your organisation an innovation engine


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