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22 artists, 50 artworks: MayInArt gears up for Singapore exhibition with Indian and Indonesian artists

In this two-part photo essay on the MayinArt exhibition, we showcase outstanding artwork along with curator insights on creativity.

22 artists, 50 artworks: MayInArt gears up for Singapore exhibition with Indian and Indonesian artists

Sunday June 25, 2023 , 7 min Read

Launched in 2014, PhotoSparks is a weekly feature from YourStory, with photographs that celebrate the spirit of creativity and innovation. In the earlier 700 posts, we featured an art festival, cartoon gallery. world music festivaltelecom expomillets fair, climate change expo, wildlife conference, startup festival, Diwali rangoli, and jazz festival.

Based in Singapore, Mayinart is a platform to promote art from India and Indonesia (see our coverage of its earlier exhibitions here). It was founded by Krish Datta and Avik Bandyopadhyay. Formerly an IT executive with Tech Mahindra, Avik switched tracks to pursue his love for art.

Marlin Plaza by Abhijit Paul

Marlin Plaza by Abhijit Paul

MayinArt is launching a show at the American Club in Singapore next month, titled From Abstract to Realism: Discover your art personality!

“Abstract art is gaining popularity in Asia. As the name suggests, it is an abstraction of ideas and experiences with few or no recognisable objects, giving the viewers freedom of interpretation,” Avik explains, in a chat with YourStory.

Surrealism includes recognisable objects. “But it moves away from traditional interpretations and conventional methods,” he adds. Realism continues to have followers and loyalists enticed by the keen attention to detail and the ability of the artist to capture real life on canvas.

2

Avik Bandyopadhyay

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“The exhibits will showcase Indian, Indonesian and Singapore artists across various ages who are active and evolving, both in their technique and finesse,” Avik explains. The lineup includes young talents as well as established artists, in a wide range of styles.

“The range of genres will help viewers discern their own passion and inclination to art styles and discover their individual art personality,” he affirms.

The upcoming exhibition in July features 22 artists. The Indian lineup includes Abhijit Paul, Madan Lal, Saumya Bandyopadhyay, Subir Dey, and Shan Re. Artists Anjum Motiwala and Megha Sharma Singh are based in Singapore.

Finding Peace, by Nurfu Ad

Finding Peace, by Nurfu Ad

The Indonesian lineup features Bagus Triyono, Bawep Kapalatama, Budi Eka Putra, Budi Ubrux, Deddy PAW, Elisa Faustina, Fatoni Makturodi, Giring Prihatyasono, Kartika Affandi, Layong Jingga Probo, Mulyo Gunarso, Nurfu Ad, Sri Pramono, Suryadi Suyamtina, and Suryo.

Over 50 artworks will be on display. Some of the artists’ works are featured in this photo essay, with permission from the organisers.

Avik is proud of his team’s journey, particularly through the tough patch of the pandemic. Its debut show in 2020 was at Ion Orchard Singapore, with the theme If walls could speak.

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Krish Datta

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“It was a resounding success in terms of sales, media coverage, brand building, and boosting public perception of MayinArt’s reputation,” Avik proudly recalls.

Then the pandemic hit. “Although it hampered art sales for us and the rest of the world, it did not dampen our spirits. We quickly reordered ourselves and held a hybrid show in Jogjakarta,” he says.

The exhibition was titled Ataraxia, which means the ability to maintain a calm and balanced state of mind in times of crisis and uncertainty.

Budi Ubrux

Budi Ubrux

Its aim was to present a curation to elevate the energy of home and office spaces. “Our curators chose bright and vibrant works that could provide that burst of creativity and inspiration, that was otherwise taken away from us due to lockdowns and socialising restrictions,” Avik explains.

Due to shipping restrictions during that period, most artworks were sold within Indonesia only. “We also held a few purely online exhibitions through VR technology, though sales were few and far between,” he says.

The next show in 2021 was at the American Club, titled Discover the undiscovered. “By this time, our curation had become stronger and diverse with the discovery of a few fantastic new-age young artists,” Avik enthuses.

Bull Beautiful (#1) by Saumya Bandyopadhyay

Bull Beautiful (#1) by Saumya Bandyopadhyay

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This show was successful as well. “As a gallery and a curatorial team, nothing gives more pleasure than the reassurance that we had read the pulse of the audience and presented to them the best possible experience,” he says.

“Curation is an editorial process. It’s a mix of art and science. It requires a clear and definable voice, an editorial mission, and an understanding of your audience and community,” Avik explains. The exhibition should have harmony as well.

The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on the art world, including art exhibitions. “It saw the closure of museums, galleries, and other art spaces. Many exhibitions had to be cancelled, postponed, or moved to virtual formats to comply with social distancing measures and other safety protocols,” Avik recalls.

Deddy PAW

Deddy PAW

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Virtual exhibitions allowed visitors to explore art from the comfort of their homes. “They often included interactive features and multimedia components,” he says.

However, there are still many challenges facing the art world as a result of the pandemic. “For example, some artists have been unable to create new work due to the disruption to their lives and routines, while others have struggled to find new audiences in the absence of in-person events,” Avik laments.

The economic impact of the pandemic also made it difficult for some art institutions to continue operating, leading to closures and other disruptions. “Overall, while there have been some innovative responses to the various challenges, the long-term effects of the pandemic on the art world are still unfolding,” he observes.

Inner Peace (#1), by Elisa Faustina

Inner Peace (#1), by Elisa Faustina

Avik points to a number of art trends in the region. “Indonesia and India are both countries with rich and diverse artistic traditions. In Indonesia, one trend has been the emergence of contemporary art as a force to be reckoned with,” Avik says.

Contemporary Indonesian artists are exploring a wide range of themes and mediums, including performance art, video installations, and mixed media. “Many of these artists are also engaging with issues of identity, politics, and social justice,” he adds.

Another trend in Indonesian art has been the growing interest in traditional crafts and techniques. “There is a renewed appreciation for the country's rich heritage of textiles, batik, and other crafts, with contemporary artists drawing inspiration from these traditions to create new works,” Avik explains.

Fullmoon, by Sri Pramono

Fullmoon, by Sri Pramono

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In India, Avik observes the rise of women artists. “Women artists are gaining more visibility and recognition, and are exploring a range of themes and mediums, including sculpture, installation and new media. These artists are also engaging with issues of gender, identity and politics,” he says.

Another trend in Indian art has been the exploration of new media and technologies. “Indian artists are increasingly working with digital media, video, and virtual reality, creating immersive experiences that push the boundaries of traditional art forms,” Avik observes.

Overall, he feels confident about the vibrancy and dynamism of art in both countries. “The trends described above are just a few examples of the many exciting developments in these countries' art scenes in recent years,” he says.

Layong Jingga Probo

Layong Jingga Probo  

On the tech front, Avik sees AI and NFTs making a significant impact on the art world. “AI is being used to create new forms of art and to push the boundaries of what is possible in terms of creativity and innovation,” he says.

“NFTs are also changing the way that art is bought and sold, providing new opportunities for artists and collectors alike,” he adds.

He feels artists and galleries must stay ahead in this rapidly changing landscape. “It is important to stay informed and be open to new technologies and trends. This might involve exploring new mediums and techniques, such as incorporating AI or blockchain technology into their work,” he suggests.

Lotus (#2), by Budi Ubrux

Lotus (#2), by Budi Ubrux

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Avik advises having a strong online presence, as more and more art sales are happening through digital channels.

Galleries can also play an important role in supporting artists as they navigate these changes. “This might involve providing resources and training on new technologies, as well as offering guidance on how to navigate the complex world of NFTs and digital art sales,” he says.

“Ultimately, the key to success in the art world is to remain adaptable and open to change. By embracing new technologies and approaches, artists and galleries can position themselves to thrive in a rapidly evolving landscape,” Avik signs off.

Now, what have you done today to pause in your busy schedule and find new avenues to apply your creativity?

Diary (#1), by Suryadi Suyamtina

Diary (#1), by Suryadi Suyamtina

  Subir Dey

  Subir Dey 

Towards a Blessing, by Megha Sharma Singh

Towards a Blessing, by Megha Sharma Singh

Urban Empire (#5), by Abhijit Paul

Urban Empire (#5), by Abhijit Paul

The Journey, by Bagus Triyono

The Journey, by Bagus Triyono

(All images courtesy MayinArt.)

See also the YourStory pocketbook ‘Proverbs and Quotes for Entrepreneurs: A World of Inspiration for Startups,’ accessible as apps for Apple and Android devices.


Edited by Kanishk Singh